Assess, Prevent, and Treat: Eruption Of An Impacted Canine With A Cantilever Or Whip Spring

One of the most common orthodontic problems encountered by practitioners is the orthodontic movement and eruption of ectopic and impacted canines.1 Maxillary canines are the second most commonly impacted teeth with a reported incidence rate of 1.29% in 5000 sample patients.2 Additionally, tooth transposition presents orthodontic challenges such as deciding upon correction or not.

If the ectopic eruption of a maxillary canine is severe enough, it is possible for the following sequelae to happen: impaction or transposition. According to an Australian Society of Orthodontists Brighter Futures newsletter, “An ectopic tooth is defined as a tooth that is following an abnormal eruption path whereas an impacted tooth is a tooth that is unable to erupt without assistance and is usually associated with an ectopic path of eruption.”3

According to Gebert, “tooth transposition, reported since the early nineteenth century, is described not only as a reversal of position between two teeth in the same quadrant of the dental arch, especially in relation to their roots; but also as the development or eruption of a tooth in a position normally occupied by a non-adjacent element.”4

One of the most common orthodontic problems encountered by practitioners is the orthodontic movement and eruption of ectopic and impacted canines.1 Maxillary canines are the second most commonly impacted teeth with a reported incidence rate of 1.29% in 5000 sample patients.2 Additionally, tooth transposition presents orthodontic challenges such as deciding upon correction or not.

If the ectopic eruption of a maxillary canine is severe enough, it is possible for the following sequelae to happen: impaction or transposition. According to an Australian Society of Orthodontists Brighter Futures newsletter, “An ectopic tooth is defined as a . . .

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