Arch Anchorage & Stabilization Minimize Tooth Movements

Arch stabilization is essential to prevent unwanted movements during orthodontic eruption of impacted teeth. This is especially pertinent during treatment when dealing with more than one impacted tooth. Adequate space and arch development are necessary for completion of any normal orthodontic treatment. Proper finishing mechanics from incorporating impacted tooth eruptions can be challenging to accomplish.

Several factors must be considered when initializing treatment dealing with tooth impactions. What was the cause of the impaction if any? Is there still potentially a digit or tongue habit perpetuating the current patient presentation? Are there factors that are contributing to the condition from ectopic eruptions, to ondontogenic obstructions like a mesodens, or some type of compound or complex ondontomas?

According to Proffitt, a localized problem is typically created either by displacement of a permanent tooth from its normal eruption path so that the tooth becomes impacted (usually the maxillary canine: or by trauma that leads to ankylosis.)1 One must consider all potential outcomes of attempting treatment including analyzing the degree of displacement and other factors. Arch anchorage and stability are key to minimizing unwanted tooth movements.

Arch stabilization is essential to prevent unwanted movements during orthodontic eruption of impacted teeth. This is especially pertinent during treatment when dealing with more than one impacted tooth. Adequate space and arch development are necessary for completion of any normal orthodontic treatment. Proper finishing mechanics from incorporating impacted tooth eruptions can be challenging to accomplish.

Several factors must be considered when initializing treatment dealing with tooth impactions. What was the cause of the impaction if any? Is there still potentially a digit or tongue habit perpetuating the current patient presentation? Are there factors that are contributing to . . .

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Andrey Horton

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